Science

The new epic images show the NASA rover during its landing on Mars

NASA has released new photos of its enduring Mars spacecraft captured just moments before its six wheels collided with Earth, a startling glimpse of the demonic complex landing on the innovative Sky Crane. The persistent rover – complete with its Martian helicopter facilities – landed on the surface of Mars on Thursday afternoon, February 18th, the culmination of millions of thousands of travel and years of work by NASA and its partners.

The landing was even more terrifying for this team because the exact way it went was completely out of NASA’s hands. At 147 million miles from Earth, Mars is far from the immediate communication distance. In fact, it takes more than 11 minutes for the signal to travel in one direction: in fact, the journey is taking longer than planned to continue through the Martian atmosphere.

That means she had to persevere with running the show, pre-programmed with a multi-stage process aimed at shedding massive amounts of speed and finished off with a gentle touch. This included using the Martian atmosphere to slow down dramatically and launching a large parachute to reduce the rate of descent, just in time for sixteen precisely controlled rockets to nearly conceal the “jet pack” below Earth.

The last 70 feet or so saw the rover landing on a jetpack ropes, with NASA’s Sky Crane system still dropping its jaw. This allows for smoother landing and controlled persistence, even if the ground below is uneven. The jetpack then flies off and leaves Jezero Crater – the land of the new rover – without smearing.

This new image Shared by NASA It just shows how this drop happened, which is an incredible picture. Captured by a camera on a Jetpack, it shows perseverance in the air, suspended just moments before its six independently controlled wheels touch the Martian soil.

NASA will be examining a lot of images and videos from Mars over the coming months, as Perseverance systems are running online and powering them through scans. The rover contains 19 cameras and two microphones, and is equipped with seven different scientific instruments to aid in exploring both the surface of Mars and below. It will also collect samples in special tubes, designed to wait for it on the Red Planet so that a future mission can recover it, and on a subsequent mission, it will return it to Earth for further analysis.

What we have now are various images shared from some of the oldest cameras online. This includes an extended panorama of the Mars horizon around the rover, as well as shots Near the wheels of perseverance.



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