Science

The Feds are ordering countries to expand vaccine targets as Covid-19 deaths mount

The idea of ​​using current vaccine supplies for the first doses has drawn objections from some health workers and researchers, who fear that front-loaded shots will increase the risk of delaying the second injection. Clinical studies that tested vaccines showed that the vaccines were effective when given in two doses according to a strict schedule. While some protection appears to begin after the first shot, experts remain unsure of the extent of that protection, or how long it might last without the second dose to enhance its effects.

But some others Vocal called The second dose delays, arguing that the wide distribution of partial protection afforded by one shot will save more lives.

Even before the command Tuesday, Health experts and state officials faced difficult choices They decided which groups would have priority in launching the vaccine. While older Americans have died from the virus at the highest rates, primary workers bear the greatest risk of infection, and the category includes many poor and people of color, Who experienced disproportionately high rates of injury and death.

Despite his rugged state offering, Gov. Florida’s Ron DeSantes, who has prioritized people age 65 or older from the start, said he believes getting all seniors eligible is the right thing to always do.

In a sprawling retirement community called Villages, Mr. DeSantes said Tuesday at a news conference. “This does not acknowledge how this virus affected the elderly.”

In New York that This week started with vaccinating people 75 years of age or older and over essential workers, Ruler. Andrew M. Cuomo said the state will accept the new federal directive to prioritize people age 65 and older, although he stressed that the state will not have nearly enough vaccine in the short term to reach its newly targeted population.

Mr Cuomo said the new directives will make more than seven million New Yorkers eligible for the vaccine, even though the state currently only receives 300,000 doses per week.

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