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More than 300,000 New Yorkers have fled the Big Apple in the past eight months

More than 300,000 residents have fled New York City over the past month amid complete disruption from the Coronavirus epidemic, school pressures and increased crime, according to a report.

Data obtained New York Post From the U.S. Postal Service revealed that New Yorkers have already left the city in an ongoing exodus after some opinion pieces denounced the death of the Big Apple.

The Post reported that New Yorkers submitted 295,103 address change requests from March 1 through October 31 – but the total number of people leaving is likely much higher.

The data only appears when at least 11 forwarding requests have been made to a specific county outside of New York City, and a single address change can involve a family of multiple people.

The coronavirus epidemic began migration in March, when high infections and deaths imposed restrictions that led to the city being closed.

The New York Post reported that New Yorkers submitted 295,103 address change requests from March 1 through October 31 - but the number likely exceeded 300,000 in fact.

The New York Post reported that New Yorkers submitted 295,103 address change requests from March 1 through October 31 – but the number likely exceeded 300,000 in fact.

Businesses have been temporarily closed, office buildings have been replaced by work from home operations, schools have turned to distance learning and the economy has faltered due to a lack of tourism.

In an interview with Monitor the marketNew York City Superintendent Scott Stringer noted a 90 percent drop in tourism in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2020.

In the midst of a pandemic, we are starting to realize that we have 62 million [annual] Visitors will not be tourists in the short term, ”Stringer told Market Watch.

We haven’t lost our charm as a city, but the pandemic has limited what we can do to attract people from all over the world.

There were 244,895 address changes from March through July, the Washington Post reported. This is 143,553 – or more than doubling – from 101,342 applications filed during the same time last year.

According to experts who monitor the city’s changing demographics, economic stress and confusion over schools and the crime rate have contributed alongside the epidemic.

New York City has recorded more than 284,000 cases and 24,100 deaths.

People wear face masks on November 10 at Red Steps in Times Square, a normally crowded attraction that sees hordes of tourists every day.

People wear face masks on November 10 at Red Steps in Times Square, a normally crowded attraction that sees hordes of tourists every day.

“I think people are scared,” Michael Hendricks, director of government and local policy at the Manhattan Institute, told The Post.

They are afraid of contracting a deadly virus, fear of crime and other quality of life concerns. One thing we also hear is garbage and city cleanliness.

The institute Transfer It found that 44 percent of New Yorkers who earn $ 100,000 or more annually have considered moving out of the city over the past several months.

Most respondents cited “cost of living” as the biggest factor.

More than half of New Yorkers with high incomes work entirely from home, and nearly two-thirds believe this will be the new normal for the city. Among those considering leaving New York City, 30% said the possibility of working remotely increases the likelihood that they will move.

The report revealed that only 38 percent thought the quality of life was good or excellent, while the same percentage of people believed New York City was heading in the wrong direction.

Mayor Bill de Blasio criticized the residents’ friends fleeing the fair weather in August, but the governor. Andrew Como had pleaded with wealthy residents to stay.

Many of the city’s high-income earners fled to the Hamptons, taking their money and resources with them.

Concerns about education proved to be an important consideration for surveyors, with 53 percent indicating that they were concerned about getting their children back to school.

Pictured: Gov.  Andrew Como

Pictured: Major Bill de Blasio

New York Governor. Andrew Cuomo (left) has urged wealthy New Yorkers to return to the Big Apple, but Mayor Bill de Blasio called them “ friends of the fair weather ” this summer

De Blasio said in August that the entire school system would automatically return to full distance education if the city’s positive rate over an average of seven days exceeds three percent.

He repeated the warning this week as the city reported that 2.6 per cent of tests conducted over the past week were positive.

De Blasio is expected to face an even greater backlash if he goes ahead with the classroom closure plan despite data showing that the virus’s transmission in schools has been remarkably low – at a positive rate of just 0.17%.

The roller coaster school schedule has pushed some parents to the limit of their intelligence.

A report found that 44 percent of New Yorkers who earn $ 100,000 or more annually have considered moving out of the city over the past several months.  Pictured: An engine puts his belongings in a moving truck after the outbreak of Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) in the Manhattan neighborhood of New York City

A report found that 44 percent of New Yorkers who earn $ 100,000 or more annually have considered moving out of the city over the past several months. Pictured: An engine puts his belongings in a moving truck after the outbreak of Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) in the Manhattan neighborhood of New York City

In terms of crime, the city saw a slight rise this summer in shootings and armed violence in the five neighborhoods.

New York Police CompStat 2.0 It showed there’s been a slight increase in homicides in New York City, with 339 recorded this year and 289 in 2019 – a 38.1 percent increase as of last Sunday.

The number of shooting victims has risen dramatically this year, reaching 1,635 such incidents, after officials recorded 812 last year. That’s a rise of 101.4 percent.

“The biggest reason people are leaving the city is uncertainty about when the epidemic will end and how quickly the New York economy will recover,” Catherine Wilde, president of the New York City Partnership, told The Post.

More than half a million city dwellers who used to work in the retail, restaurant and service sectors have lost their jobs and cannot afford the city rents.

“The late decision to reopen public and private schools has forced many families to relocate so that they can set registration deadlines in the areas they have been living in during the pandemic.”

Postal data obtained by The Post showed that a large portion of New Yorkers simply moved across the road to New Jersey, Long Island and Westchester.

Some of the factors behind the mass exodus include economic pressures linked to the coronavirus epidemic, rising crime this summer and the cost of living.

Some of the factors behind the mass exodus include economic pressures linked to the coronavirus epidemic, rising crime this summer and the cost of living.

Women wearing masks hold hands while snowing at Bank of America’s “Winter Village” in Bryant Park on November 13th – a usually popular time for tourists and visitors.

Post office officials received 21,362 requests to change the address to Suffolk County, 18,731 requests to Nassau County and 15,850 requests to Westchester County, The Post reported.

Hudson County, New Jersey has seen 9,356 applications to date.

Other popular locations included Jersey City, Skarsdale, Greenwich, Connecticut, and the Hamptons, which have 6,500 requests via six postcodes.

Some New Yorkers fled to places like Los Angeles – 8,587 – and Honolulu with 421 requests.

The Post reports that 13,009 orders have been issued for Florida counties such as Miami-Dade and Broward.

Rich residents of the city’s Upper West Side filed 9,076 requests for mail forwarding – the largest in the city.

Earlier this summer, residents of the Upper West Side protested the establishment of a homeless shelter in the area and complained about the escalation of crime.

And the Vacancies in the apartment It reached its highest number since 2006 at 16,145.

A report by the New York Real Estate Board found that the city and state lost $ 1.4 billion in tax revenue due to faltering interest in 2020.

As New Yorkers moved through zip codes

Between March 1 and October 31:

1. Uber West Side 10023: 3,368

2. Upper West Side 10025: 3000

3. Murray Hill, 10016: 2889

4. Upper West Side 10024: 2708

5. Chelsea / Greenwich Village, 10011: 2520

6. Upper East Side, 10128: 2165

7. Downtown Brooklyn, 11201: 1,836

8. Gramercy / East Village 10003: 1,677

9. Upper East Side 10028: 1631

10. Midtown East, 10022: 1410

11. Midtown West, 10019: 1,484

12. Upper East Side 10021: 1506

13. Chelsea 10001: 1,222

14. West Village, 10014: 1,192

15. Park Slope, Brooklyn, 11215: 1006

16. Rose Hill / Peter Cooper Village, 10010: 002

17. Midtown, 10018: 987

18. Tribeca / Chinatown, 10013: 899

19. Midtown, 10036: 837

20. East Village 10009: 728

Source: New York Post

As New Yorkers moved by zip codes

Between March 1 and October 31:

1. East Hampton, New York, 11937: 2769

2. Jersey City, NJ 07302: 1,821

3. Southampton, New York, 11968: 1,398

4. Hoboken, NJ, 1204: 07030

5. Sag Harbor, New York, 11963: 961

6. Scarsdale, New York, 10583: 812

7. Water Mill, NY, 11976: 577

8. Greenwich, Connecticut, 06830: 558

9. Yonkers, New York: 10701, 567

10. Jersey City, NJ 07310: 434

11. Port Washington, New York, 11050: 414

12. Westhampton Beach, NY, 11978: 409

13. Princeton, NJ, 08540: 395

14. Woodstock, New York, 12498: 392

15. New Canaan, CT, 06840: 389

16. Great Nick / Manhasset, New York, 11021: 380

17. Hampton Bays, New York, 11946: 344

18. Darren, K. T, 06820: 326

19. Mount Vernon, New York, 10550: 325

20. Long Beach, New York, 11561: 323

Source: New York Post

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