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COVID-19 updates in Illinois: Here’s what happens Friday

Illinois reverted to tighter restrictions on the coronavirus on Friday, entering Level 3 mitigation levels designed to slow the spread of COVID-19.

These measures have shut down most businesses and public places designed to gather people, such as theaters, museums and concert halls, as well as banning indoor dining and closing bars except for outdoor service. The rules restrict gatherings at home to family members, and reduce legal capacity in retail stores, and personal care service companies such as salons and health and fitness centers.

The crackdown comes as the state continues to see an explosion in COVID-19 cases and a return to large numbers of deaths, close to the numbers seen in the spring.

Illinois health officials on Friday announced 13,012 new confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 and 126 additional deaths, bringing the total number of known infections in Illinois to 634,395 and the statewide death toll to 11,304 since the start of the pandemic.

Here’s what happens on Friday with COVID-19 in the Chicago and Illinois area:

12:04 PM: 13,012 new confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases, 126 additional deaths

Illinois health officials on Friday announced 13,012 new confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 and 126 additional deaths, bringing the total number of known infections in Illinois to 634,395 and the statewide death toll to 11,304 since the start of the pandemic. Officials also reported 116,024 new tests in the past 24 hours.

The statewide seven-day rotation positive rate for cases as a share of the total testing was 11.5% for the period ending Thursday, up from 8% on November 1.

10:49 a.m .: Rising COVID-19 cases are forcing families into tough conversations, last-minute travel changes ahead of Thanksgiving

Irene Vickers didn’t want to be the only one who didn’t join her family on Thanksgiving at her brother’s Virginia home.

But once the Chicago stay-at-home consultation was announced, Vickers, 37, of Lakeview, Chicago, emailed her family and told them she was not making the trip. They were sad, but they did not try to change her mind.

No one mentioned the topic of Christmas.

“For me, it’s too far to talk about it.” “If it was still this way, it would be difficult,” she said.

10:12 a.m .: Mary Jane Cafe, much loved Humboldt Park restaurant, will close on Mondays

Although unfortunately we have to get used to restaurants closing in 2020, this is really painful. Advertising for Mary Jane’s (1001 N.

They clarified in the letter that they plan to stay open until Monday. They urge fans to “Come on and say hello, grab your last cheesy burger, see what CMJ classics are our specials, and make a deal on a range of wines.”

9:50 a.m .: CTA to operate holiday trains and buses, but passengers will not be able to board

The Public Transportation Agency announced Friday, that the CTA will run its trains and buses during the holidays, despite the Coronavirus epidemic, but only Santa, Jane and CTA workers, not regular riders, will be able to climb this year due to CTA danagers.

In a press release Friday, the agency said that the holiday train will start operating on November 27, the day after Thanksgiving. The holiday buses will begin running through Chicago neighborhoods on December 1.

According to the statement, “Santa and his commissions will remain socially distant in the holiday season, which means customers will not be able to take on the CTA Vacation Train or the CTA Vacation Bus”. “Instead, the CTA Vacation Fleet will operate along every rail and multiple bus routes, spreading the joy of the holiday throughout the city.”

The six-car holiday train will be decorated with holiday scenes, thousands of twinkling lights and bright LED screens, with Santa and the reindeer riding in a flat-car in the center of the train, according to the statement.

7:53 a.m.: Getting COVID-19 testing for children can be difficult, but schools often require it. “It really puts parents in a difficult position.”

For months, many Illinois parents have struggled to get tested for COVID-19 in schools and it may require day care before a child can return after illness. They often face confusing obstacles and requirements: Many pediatricians will not test children for COVID-19, some test sites have age restrictions and some professions and schools only accept certain types of testing.

The situation has worsened amid the current COVID-19 surge in Illinois, which in many cases has resulted in longer test wait times. At a time when many parents work from home or are anxious about retaining their jobs, the challenges surrounding the test add another level of stress.

7 a.m.: Illinois under mitigation of Level 3 as COVID-19 cases continue to rise

The recent increase in coronavirus cases statewide caused Illinois to return to tougher coronavirus restrictions on Friday.

The state is now under Mitigation from Level 3 Regulations designed to slow the spread of COVID-19.

The Measures Close most businesses and public places designed to gather people, such as theaters, museums and concert halls, as well as banning indoor dining and closing bars except for outdoor service. The rules restrict gatherings at home to family members, and reduce legal capacity in retail stores, and personal care service companies such as salons and health and fitness centers.

The crackdown comes as the country is witnessing an explosion of COVID-19 cases and a return to large numbers of deaths, with Illinois much higher than the number of known daily cases seen in the spring and close to the number of daily deaths seen in the pandemic. The first wave.

6:15 am: Pfizer seeks emergency COVID-19 vaccine, which could expose first batch of footage to the public by December

Pfizer said Friday it is asking US regulators to allow emergency use of its COVID-19 vaccine, starting the clock in a process that could bring in limited first shots as early as next month and ultimately ending the pandemic – but not until after a long harsh winter.

The measure comes days after Pfizer Inc and its German partner BioNTech announced that their vaccine appears to be 95% effective in preventing mild to severe COVID-19 disease in a large, ongoing study.

The companies said the protection plus a good safety record means that the vaccine must be eligible for emergency use permission, something the FDA can grant before the final test is fully completed. In addition to the FDA’s filing on Friday, they have already started “trading” applications in Europe and the UK and intend to provide similar information soon.

“Our work to provide a safe and effective vaccine has not been more urgent than ever,” Albert Burla, CEO of Pfizer, said in a statement.

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